Global Statistics

All countries
195,782,367
Confirmed
Updated on 27/07/2021 7:49 pm
All countries
175,769,998
Recovered
Updated on 27/07/2021 7:49 pm
All countries
4,189,796
Deaths
Updated on 27/07/2021 7:49 pm

Global Statistics

All countries
195,782,367
Confirmed
Updated on 27/07/2021 7:49 pm
All countries
175,769,998
Recovered
Updated on 27/07/2021 7:49 pm
All countries
4,189,796
Deaths
Updated on 27/07/2021 7:49 pm

The third wave of covid will depend on two factors, the mutation of the virus and human error.

New Delhi [India], June 20 (ANI): With overall COVID-19 cases in India steadily declining over the past few weeks, several states have begun easing COVID restrictions and crowds have started to grow in markets, where it can be seen to people without masks and mocking Appropriate COVID behavior that could lead to an increase in cases again.

“In any pandemic, the wave depends on two important factors: one is related to the virus and the second is related to humans,” said Dr. Neeraj Nischal, assistant professor in the AIIMS Department of Medicine, New Delhi.

According to Dr. Nischal, the virus mutation is not in someone’s hand, but proper behavior can prevent an increase in COVID cases.

“Now the virus mutates and becomes more infectious. It is something that is beyond our control. But of course, if we do not allow this virus to replicate in our body, then perhaps these types of mutations can be avoided. What can we do? do to control “It is our behavior. We have been talking about proper COVID behavior for 15-16 months and we know that through proper COVID behavior, one can stop these waves entirely. That had also happened in the second wave, “he said.

Speaking about the lockdown, the doctor said: “when the lockdown was introduced, everyone was forced to follow the appropriate COVID behavior and this wave stopped. Therefore, it is important that we follow the appropriate COVID behavior, as it definitely it is helpful in stopping the spread of infection. “

In addition, he said that vaccination will also help prevent infections. “Even if you do get the infection, it will make sure you don’t get a serious form of the disease,” he added.

(Only the headline and image for this report may have been edited by Business Standard staff; other content is automatically generated from a syndicated feed.)

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