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The Minnesota Supreme Court will decide whether cameras will be permanently allowed in the courtroom

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The Minnesota Supreme Court will hear arguments on whether to allow cameras permanently in the courtroom, following the trials of former police officers Derek Chauvin and Kim Potter that were watched by millions of people around the world.

An advisory committee made up of Minnesota judges, attorneys and court staff recommends that the court continue its routine of keeping cameras away. Minnesota media and advocacy groups say it’s time for the state to embrace the technology like neighboring Iowa, Wisconsin and North Dakota.

The Minnesota superior court is scheduled to hear arguments on the issue Tuesday.

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The Minnesota Supreme Court will hear arguments on whether to allow cameras in the courtroom.
(FoxNews)

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The presiding judges of the Hennepin County District Court initially objected to cameras in the courtroom for the notorious trials of Chauvin for the murder of George Floyd and Potter for the murder of Daunte Wright. Both justices, Peter Cahill and Regina Chu, changed their minds in part due to the immense public interest and limitations of COVID-19.

The media and government organizations, along with Cahill, sent letters to the Supreme Court in support of expanding access to cameras. Victims’ rights groups, public defenders, defense attorneys and prosecutors oppose it, the Star Tribune reported.

“The fact is these are incredibly emotional times, difficult times for all parties involved,” said Minnesota State Public Defender Bill Ward. “Justice should not be a spectator sport and should not be sensationalized in the media.”

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Mankato Free Press managing editor Joe Spear wrote to the court that the presence of a camera does not change the truth.

“It just sheds more light on that,” he said.

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