Global Statistics

All countries
192,063,181
Confirmed
Updated on 20/07/2021 6:31 pm
All countries
173,044,740
Recovered
Updated on 20/07/2021 6:31 pm
All countries
4,116,946
Deaths
Updated on 20/07/2021 6:31 pm

Global Statistics

All countries
192,063,181
Confirmed
Updated on 20/07/2021 6:31 pm
All countries
173,044,740
Recovered
Updated on 20/07/2021 6:31 pm
All countries
4,116,946
Deaths
Updated on 20/07/2021 6:31 pm

Aukey Has Issues With Amazon, All Their Products Have Been Removed – Review Geek

Cameron summerson

When it comes to affordable laptop batteries, chargers, and other accessories, Aukey was a trusted and well-known name in the Amazon marketplace. “Was” being the keyword because Amazon seems to have removed all Aukey’s listings and closed Aukey’s store.

Go to Aukey Store, and you will find that all the links are broken. Either they don’t exist or they lead to products that are “not available.” At first glance, it’s a surprising turn of events considering the huge popularity and ubiquity of Aukey products – it had dozens of entries, with more coming all the time.

The few cases of products in stock that we can find do not come from Amazon or Aukey, but from third-party sellers. Given that the storefront still exists, it seems unlikely that Amazon has removed all of Aukey’s listings. Similarly, another well-known accessory manufacturer, Mpow, seems to be missing from Amazon as well. Visit the Mpow store and almost all products are listed as “unavailable”. But we found two headphones still shipped and sold by Amazon.

We don’t know for sure why Aukey (and perhaps Mpow) was removed from Amazon. But speculation offers a likely scenario: fake reviews. Last week, the people of Security detectives discovered an insecure database that revealed a massive fake review scheme from Chinese third-party manufacturers.

As is often the case, the manufacturers used a simple method to scam the Amazon review system: They used a new product and then contacted the reviewers outside of Amazon’s systems. That reviewer would agree to purchase the product, review it favorably, in exchange for compensation you paid for the product, and invest additional money in the person’s product.

Once enough fake reviews came in, Amazon would take note of the five-star quality reviews from “verified buyers” and highlight the product heavily. Then customers would buy the products and create legitimate reviews. Unfortunately, the products deserve high reviews in many cases, but the company paid people to get the process going. And that’s against Amazon’s terms.

Safety Detective reports revealed 13 million records related to the scheme, but did not directly identify which vendors were involved. But considering the timing, it’s not a huge leap to assume that the report led to Aukey and Mpow’s disappearance.

For now, we have reached out to Amazon for a statement and will update this post when we learn more.

via Digital trends

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